3D Concrete Printer Can Build A 2500sqft Home In One Day

/ 3 years ago


3D printing is big business, but up until now it has been about small things made of plastics. Sure there are other 3D printing technologies, such as the ones used in Formula 1 to create prototypes and there is even a company that can print metal objects, but nothing compares to the scale of this new concrete 3D printer.


The University of Southern California is testing a giant 3D printer than can print a whole house in less than 24 hours! Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis designed the giant robot which take the place of the entire construction work force and replaces it with a frame, a printer head and a tank of concrete. The basic principle is exactly the same as any other 3D printer, it’s just really, really, really big.


The potential for cheap, efficient builds is staggering and it could massively reduce the cost of home-owning, make quick and affordable shelter in disaster zones a reality and more.

“Ultimately it would work like this,” says Brad Lemley from Discover Magazine. “On a cleared and levelled site, workers would lay down two rails a few feet further apart than the eventual building’s width and a computer-controlled contour crafter would take over from there. A gantry-type crane with a hanging nozzle and a components-placing arm would travel along the rails. The nozzle would spit out concrete in layers to create hollow walls, and then fill in the walls with additional concrete… humans would hang doors and insert windows.”

Just imagine picking a house design from an iPad, thinking “hey I don’t want that door there!” so you just adjust the model, upload it to the printer and the very next day you’re fitting the carpets, awesome!


Don’t be fooled to thinking this is a cheap copy of a house either, the Contour Crafting technique prints the walls that can resist 10,000PSI (pounds per square inch) compared with a regular wall that would normally take 3,000PSI.


The potential is huge for this project, multiple printers could build anything from office blocks to whole estates, or even just larger houses in record time, for lower prices and could be integrated with traditional building techniques to create homes that were previously impossible, or too complex to construct by hand.

Thank you MSN for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of MSN.

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  • Skidmarks

    This is great news for all except for the poor sod of a brick layer who is now left standing with his hands in his pockets without a job and a hungry family to feed.
    It seems like 3D printing is only limited by the imagination. I struggle to comprehend it. Mind you most would’ve struggled to comprehend smartphones 10 years ago.

    • Conor Rose

      Very true, but new technologies arise all the time, and at the start most need the manual labour to guide it… There will be a need for bricklaying etc even with this tech… You still need people to operate the machines, maintain them and even do the odds jobs the printer can’t really do. Sure ultimately it could put a lot of bricklayers out of work but I think this could really be very useful in the bigger picture!

      • Skidmarks

        Of course. No one can stop progression. By the looks of things, 3D printing is going to change the world as we know it. Personally I’m looking forward to this technology although I don’t understand it yet.

    • Grenther

      History repeats itself.
      ever since the industrial revolution this is has been said, yeah old jobs dissapear but you’ll get new ones in the place.
      a lot of tasks are done with machines nowadays that 100 years ago were still done with the hand, this is just the next step.
      but even though this is the case we still are able to provide enough jobs, look at the IT buisness, its only getting more and more important and thus is the amounts of people needed for it.

  • Shovinus

    I do love the view of “but what about the (insert job profession here)” ultimately though technologies that increase work out put reduce cost for everyone, leading to the eventual point that all work is done by robots and man just sits on his arse doing pretty much what he wants, each industrial change leads to a loss of jobs, but you will find that generally those workers find an easier job and no longer have to work as hard to say buy a house because someone prints it in a day.

    Years ago everyone worked in the fields all day just to get food, when the tractors and combine harvesters came along those people just did different stuff with the time they had, meaning they could produce more meaning everyone had more. Because not everyone was in the field and was instead making pots pan, or whatever else.

    So next time you want to say but what about the (insert job profession here) think again.