Adesso iMouse E10 – 2.4 GHz RF Wireless Vertical Ergonomic Mouse Review



/ 1 year ago

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Introduction


Addesso E10 Featured Small

The peripheral market is booming, there’s a huge range of products with a wide range of features available between each device, so finding something suitable for your needs shouldn’t be too difficult. Naturally, not all products are created equally and some are designed for a more niche part of the market than others, such as the iMouse E10 which we have in for review today. The E10 is one strange-looking mouse, with a design that is almost vertical. It has been crafted to help prevent or alleviate wrist strain while using your desktop computer; much in the same way that an ergonomic keyboard better suits the natural angle of your arms and wrists.

I’m not expecting the greatest performance in the world from this mouse, although the specifications do suggest that it’s pretty capable for day-to-day use in home or at the office, I don’t have huge expectations for using it in a gaming environment; although I’m still going to try.

Specifications:

  • Tracking Method: Optical Sensor
  • Connectivity: 2.4 GHz RF Wireless Technology
  • Resolution: 3 Levels (1000/1500/2000 DPI)
  • Buttons: 6 Buttons (Left & Right Click, Back & Forward, DPI Switch, Scroll Wheel)
  • Hand Orientation: Right Hand Orientation
  • Power: AAA Batteries
  • Dimension: 3.0″ x 4.7″ x 2.5″ (75 x 125 x 63 mm)
  • Weight: 0.3 lb. (113 g)

The Adesso E10 comes equipped with wireless 2.4 GHz RF technology, it can be hooked up to any system with a compatible receiver/transmitter, or you can use the included USB dongle. Adesso also includes a pair of AAA batteries in the box.

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There’s no other way of saying it, this mouse looks freaking weird! It’s unlike any other computer mouse I’ve ever seen or used. The layout isn’t all the different from any other mouse, there’s still two mouse buttons on the top and a nice quality rubber grip scroll wheel in the middle, but obviously the whole mouse is twisted and looks like it’s stood almost on its side.

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The other side looks just as strange. The base of the mouse and the top part are heavily curved, giving a vast ergonomic recess that provides a nice space to rest your hand.

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There are two buttons on the side for forward/back navigation, and a third button at the top which can be used to toggle the DPI level.

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The mouse is designed for right-hand use, it would be near impossible to try to operate it with your left hand.

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From the back of the mouse, you can see just how extreme the shape or the mouse is. Overall the mouse is actually quite tall, but the way it curves out towards the bottom means that it still has as much contact with the mousepad as most other desktop mice.

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The base of the mouse is equipped with four small slipmats to provide extra glide on your surface of choice. Towards the front you’ll find a master power switch, while the back of the mouse has a small recess for the USB dongle; handle if you’re traveling with this mouse as it helps keeps everything together.

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The base of the mouse can be flicked off with your finger nail, giving you access to the battery compartment.

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  • Jordan Kytyn Benns

    A bit unusual, but feels like it has that niche appeal.

  • Simon Butler

    could well work to reduce stress on the wrist but dont like the glossy finish and as its on a different angle you’d want something with a grippy texture on it, plus your gonna have increased resistance as your hand is mostly making contact with the surface instead of the weight being displaced over a normally positioned mouse that has silicone pads to glide over the surface easier

  • I’ve always been a fan of MS’s Sculpt, but this looks like it’d be fun to use!