porno izle

AMD Ryzen 7 1800X AM4 8-Core Processor Review



/ 2 months ago

« Previous Page

Next Page »

Test System and Methods


Here is the full range of test systems used for CPU and APU reviews:

Test System

AM4

  • Motherboard – MSI X370 XPOWER Gaming Titanium
  • RAM – 16GB Crucial Ballistix Sport XT (2 x 8GB) DDR4 2666MHz
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Displays – U2868PQU 4K
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z87

  • Motherboard – ASUS Maximus VII Ranger
  • RAM – 16GB Crucial Ballistix Sport XT (2 x 8GB) DDR3 1866MHz (10-10-10-30)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Displays – U2868PQU 4K
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z170

  • Motherboard – ASRock Z170 Extreme7+
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Displays – U2868PQU 4K
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z270

  • Motherboard – Combination used to determine widespread performance
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Displays – U2868PQU 4K
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

X99

  • Motherboard – ASUS ROG STRIX X99 GAMING
  • RAM – 32GB Crucial Ballistix Sport (4x8GB) 2400MHz (16-16-16-39)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Displays – U2868PQU 4K
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Games Used

  • Ashes of the Singularity (DirectX 12)
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider (DirectX 12)
  • Shadow of Mordor
  • Tomb Raider

Test Software

  • 3DMark – available here
  • AIDA64 Engineer – available here
  • Cinebench – available here
  • CPUID HWMonitor – available here
  • CPU-Z – available here
  • Handbrake – available here
  • Prime95 – available here
  • WinRAR – available here
  • WPrime – available here

Test Procedure

Here at eTeknix, we endeavour to disclose key information regarding the benchmarking process so that readers can quantify the results and attempt to replicate them using their own hardware. When it comes to CPU reviews, the benchmarks are pretty self-explanatory although there are a few exceptions. Please note, we prefer to re-test each CPU within a product’s performance range to ensure the results are completely accurate and reflect any changes to our samples over time or enhancements via graphics drivers.

This means we now include fewer results, but they are more accurate and easier to decipher. As always, your choice of motherboard, the silicon lottery and other factors can yield different numbers and there’s always a margin for error when using software. Therefore, your experience may vary. Saying that, each benchmark is run at least three times and the average figure is taken to try to reduce the effect of hardware variation. Any important details regarding the benchmarks will be listed below.

Handbrake

To stress processors to their absolute limit and accurately judge performance in video editing workloads, we transcode a 7.7GB compilation of gaming footage. This particular file is freely available from here. The captured footage is 22 minutes and 12 seconds long, has a bit rate of 50.1 Mbps and uses the Advanced Video Codec. Additionally, the video runs at a constant 30 frames-per-second and opts for a 3820×2140 (4K) resolution. Once loaded into Handbrake, we transcode the 4K MP4 to a 1080p MKV file.


Topics: , , , , , , , , , , ,

« Previous Page

Next Page »


  • Ken Kirby

    Good job Intel at beating garbage AMD at damn near every test. And good job to the reviewers to act like there’s still a reason to buy AMD

    • cyphacipher

      These numbers didn’t look like this when Linus just did his review…

      • Ejivis

        Yes it did. Ryzen hasnt beaten Intel in gaming for a single review yet.

        • Luca FiltroMan

          I’ve actually seen multiple reviews and numbers were all over the place. In some it crushed Intel, in some it has been crushed, in some others they were trading blows.

          • Ejivis

            Not a single relevant review has AMD ahead of Intel for gaming. Not a single one.

          • David Hall

            Are you actually reading the same reviews I’m reading?

    • IronMetal 🤘 PutoPeludo
  • Maurice Fortin

    Ken Kirby talking smack for nothing, like Intel or Ngreeedia have not had many similar problems. give time for optimizations and code to let Ryzen shine, then open your stupid mouth. if all we had was either Intel or Nv garbage, guess where performance and pricing be, in the toilet PERIOD.

    Many sites are biased towards Intel and Nvidia, so will always show their numbers best bu subvertly adjusting things and not saying what they have done for many reasons, and in the same manner do on purpose to show AMD/Radeon in worst light, cause they are paid to do exactly that. live in a world where there is just 2 main companies, and the world is held back, remember that. At very least, this cause Intel and partners as well as Nvidia and partners to rush to address pricing and performance issues, dont be a tool!

    • Ro-mine lottery248

      if the AMD is gonna issue another better processor like hypothetically a 1900(X) with 12 cores, at less than $750 or 800 (pretty sure at a 75% expected price in case of lower clock), even for the people prone to Intel or Nvidia, won’t leave a relatively low marks on verdict.

      wish AMD can issue a 12 core Ryzen like Intel. lawl.

  • Hossein Almet

    My 6800K clocked at 4.1 MHz for a mere 1.199 V with absolute stability, and every reviewer complained that it was hot when it first came out. Now, the 1800x, clocked 4.1 MHz for 1.488 V, and none will be complaining, I suppose. Of course for haft the price of the 6900K, it’s a no brainer.

    • Maurice Fortin

      AMD and Intel totally different design so cannot and should not expect similar voltage, heat, power used, temperatures given etc.pretty sure you mean Ghz, not Mhz, cause if you really mean only 4.1Mhz that high of a voltage will blow them up :D..and no not all sites are reporting need that crazy amount of voltage, read elsewhere they could get 4.1 at 1.34-.137v rock solid, many sites seeing as they got the review samples often only days before could place said review up i.e very limited time to do so, which ends up being they rush through overclocking and benchmarks, in overclocking tests, if you do NOT take time to tune, and just brute force approach, sure you can get the higher speed, but that much extra voltage really limits performance and clocks you can achieve, cause it means more heat, more heat, less speed, and quicker things will break.

      Funny how you said that yours only needed 1.199v for 4.1″Ghz” when every review I have just looked at showed that exact processor needing in the range of 3.65-1.477 volts AND the actually power consumed in watts and heat given off when clocked past the 4Ghz range starts to skyrocket, so, its a wash as far as “old” vs “new” Intel vs AMD, all the modern intel chips unless clocked high from the factory really really start to suck back power and get so much hotter when clock speeds are pushed up, this is not me saying such, this is 100s if not thousands of reviews to back it up, they are efficient if left at “stock” but, power(watts and volts) go up as the speed goes up, dramatically once a certain amount is reached.

      Could be you got a 99% better then any other 6800k ever released, could be it was like this for awhile with not a true 100% stability, it could be you are lying through your teeth for nothing but trolling.

      • Hossein Almet

        No, It’s a true 100% stability. The initial voltage is a mere 1.194 V, and it survived a 16 minutes CPU-Z stress test. I also used the 1.194 V setting to browse the web and watched YouTube all day without any issue. But, when I tried to export a photo of 611 MB from Adobe Lightroom, Windows crashed, Adobe Lightroom is a very power-hungry application, more so than gaming. With the 1.199 V setting, I ‘played with Lightroom for several days’ without any issue. So, 1.199 V is definitely 100% stable. But, 4 GHz @ 1.168 V is my prefer setting, as it consumes on average 10 w less, and my second favourite profile is of course the 1.199 V setting.

        • BraveLabrador

          you didn’t just win the silicon lottery, you won the silicon jackpot.

  • Illusio13

    Eteknix, why is my comment being deleted? Please can somebody ( a mod ) respond?

  • AbsoluteGenocide666
  • AZ

    So your telling me my $490 7700k is close to a $685 1800x ? I feel good mate