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App Utilizes Camera to Solve Math Problems Instantly



/ 2 years ago

photomath-1

Stuck on that last piece of calculus homework? A new app has hit the scene, the PhotoMath App allows you to solve your tricky math equations instantly just by pointing your Smart Phone camera at your paper.

Back when I was in school, my teachers always told me I needed to learn basic calculations in my head  to make adult life much easier, but little did they know, phones were going to become pretty popular and mine has a nifty calculator app pre-installed. PhotoMath takes this one step further, allowing you to solve tricky algebra equations in an instant simply by pointing your phone at the equation.

Unfortuatnely, for Android users it’s apparently not going to be available until 2015 so for the mean time you’re going to have to use the old-fashioned method. If you’re an Apple user, you can start reaping the benefits right now. However, this isn’t being marketed as the be-all and end-all of math equations as we know it, PhotoMath’s statement reads:

“PhotoMath reads and solves mathematical expressions by using the camera of your mobile device in real-time. It makes math easy and simple by educating users how to solve math problems.”

Other than simply solving the problem for you, the app also spits out an explanation as to how this answer was reached in a further effort to educate the user on its processes.

There are some mixed user reviews on the iTunes page with some users complaining that the app doesn’t always pick up the whole sum, the general feeling is mediocre at best with a 3 star current rating. To give it credit, the rating sample is quite small sitting at 10 reviews, so we’re hoping that this app isn’t a ‘pie in the sky’ ideology and actually works flawlessly in application.

If you’re looking for more of an explanation into how it functions, check out their promotion video.

Image courtesy of TechCrunch


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  • Wayne

    Hah! Back in my day at high school calculators were banned, everything had to be worked out manually with pen and paper but in my final year slide rulers were allowed. That all changed when I went to university though, there we could use electronic calculators but the scientific ones that existed back in those days were pretty large, not to mention expensive. The stuff you see today was the dream of science fiction back then.