porno

Deleting Your Browser History Could be a Crime



/ 1 year ago

delete browser history

Deleting your browser history is common practice amongst most internet users – seen as the modern equivalent of shredding old documents – but a US law that was ratified back in 2002, and has been gaining recent traction during the Boston Marathon bombing trial, seems to support the idea that deleting your internet history could be deemed an obstruction of justice.

The ruling in question stems from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which was created to tackle corporate accounting crimes – famous examples of which being the Enron and Worldcom scandals in the late 1990s – and deems destruction of evidence as a federal crime. The destruction, in this case, being the deletion of your browser history and/or cache. Section 802 of the Act considers “destroying, mutilating, concealing, falsifying records, documents, or tangible objects” to be obstruction of justice.

Back in 2010, David Kernell, suspected of hacking the Yahoo! account of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin fell victim to the ruling after it was discovered that he had deleted his internet history. “At the time Kernell took steps to clean his computer, he does not appear to have known that there was any investigation into his conduct,” The Nation reported. Federal investigators, however, deemed that knowledge irrelevant, maintaining that they were entitled to the data and that Kernell had destroyed evidence that could have incriminated him.

The same fate could now befall 24-year-old former cab driver Khairullozhon Matanov. Matanov was friends with Tamerlan and Dhzokhar Tsarnaev, the suspected perpetrators of the Boston Marathon bombing. When interviewed by police, Matanov lied about his last meeting with the Tsarnaev brothers. When he returned home from the police interview, he cleared his browser history and allegedly deleted a number of videos from his computer. For this, Matanov has been charged with obstruction of justice. He could face up to twenty years in prison.

Thank you KRMG and The Nation for providing us with this information.


Topics: , , , , ,

  • DABhand

    There is a difference from deleting your history to deleting it on purpose during an investigation. So the headline once again from eteknix is misleading.

    • Júlio Sencadas

      Either way it’s your computer you still have the right to do whatever you like in it, deleting files creating files and so on…

      If someone is under investigation and his computer isn’t confiscated, and as a result the perpetrator deletes crucial data for the case being investigated, then it’s the investigator fault, you are in your rights to use your computer as intended if no one has ceased it.

      DONT REWARD INCOMPETENCE WITH A STUPID LAW…

    • Eoin Mc Namara

      Yes, eTeknix really need to stop sensationalising headlines, and just deliver a summary

    • michael blochberger

      Perhaps you should learn to read before taking a poke at Eteknix:

      “At the time Kernell took steps to clean his computer, he does not appear to have known that there was any investigation into his conduct,” The Nation reported. Federal investigators, however, deemed that knowledge irrelevant, maintaining that they were entitled to the data and that Kernell had destroyed evidence that could have incriminated him.

      • DABhand

        Perhaps you should also take your own advice, and notice I was talking generally and not on a specific case like Kernell’s

        • michael blochberger

          “There is a difference from deleting your history to deleting it on purpose during an investigation. So the headline once again from eteknix is misleading.”

          You were talking specifically about the eteknix article. You were talking specifically about them writing misleading headlines. You were wrong, and I showed you why you were wrong. Be a big boy and admit your mistakes, because we all make them. Mine was talking to you.

          • DABhand

            The article isn’t specific on Kernell’s situation, Kernell’s situation was an added piece to the article. I suggest re-reading the article and you will see.

            The headline didn’t say “Deleting your browser history like Kernell did in 2010 could be a crime”

            So like I said the article wasn’t solely about Kernell… so you were wrong.

  • Júlio Sencadas

    Oh really, go and fuckyourself i bought my computer so i use it as i intend, i delete whatever i see fit and no one has anything to do with it!!

    • sy

      LOL

  • Joe O Sullivan

    You could be shooting yourself in the foot if you’re innocent and you need an alibi.. ‘Sorry officer I was at home all night watching porn.. check my internet history’ 🙂

  • Šimon Leška

    You can always use Incognito mode… 🙂

  • Rhigaerd

    Does not surprise me a bit, good thing i don’t live in the US. Last time i was in Chicago, went to a store around noon on a rainy day to buy a pack of cigarettes a cop car screeched behind me and halted me, for the reason that i looked suspicious, walking around at noon and all that.

  • Finn

    as long as incognito mode isn’t illegal i’m totally fine with this