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Gelid Tranquillo Rev.2 Quiet CPU Cooler Review



/ 5 years ago

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Gelid’s most recent ‘claim to fame’ in the CPU cooling market was back in 2009 via the appealing and low noise orientated Tranquillo. The Tranquillo offered good CPU cooling performance while keeping noise output to the bare minimum thanks to the use of a quiet fan. Gelid’s Tranquillo was very popular in the budget and home user market especially at the price tag of around £25 which we have more recently become accustomed to. Today we will be looking at an update of the original Tranquillo CPU cooler by Gelid, the Gelid Tranquillo Rev. 2.

Gelid most certainly haven’t forgot the traits that boosted the original Tranquillo into the highly acclaimed list of ‘purchasable’ coolers. Quiet operation is again the main event with the Tranquillo Rev. 2 while Gelid also look to up the ante a little bit with the cooler’s performance. The 1500RPM PWM fan and “intelligent PWM fan control curve” should definitely keep a CPU cool while performing quietly. The updated features that the Rev. 2 Tranquillo offers over it’s Rev. 1 brother are; better orientation of the 4 copper heatpipes as to not interfere with the motherboard components, a substantially larger heatsink is located on top of the cooler’s base, finally, new mounting hardware allowing the Tranquillo Rev. 2 to be mounted in 4 orientations on the AMD platform is included.

The word ‘gelid’ derived from the Latin word ‘gelidus’ meaning ‘extremely cold’ or ‘icy’. Let’s hope the Gelid Tranquillo Rev. 2 can keep our CPU “icy cold”.

Features:

  • 4 power heatpipes
  • Unique heatsink shape design
  • 360 degree mounting direction for AMD socket
  • Optimal heatpipe constellation
  • Improved fan blade design
  • Intelligent PWM fan control curve

Specifications:

 

[TABLE=class: retailers-tab, width: 100%]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue]Air Flow (CFM):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end]58 max[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2]Bearing:[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end]Hydro Dynamic Bearing[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue]Cable Length (mm):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end]500[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2]Current (A):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]0.18[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue, width: 170, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]DC Voltage (V):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end, width: 420, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]12[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2, width: 170]Fan Dimensions (mm)[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]120 (l) x 120 (w) x 25 (h)[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue, width: 170, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]Fan Speed (RPM):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end, width: 420, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]750 – 1500[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2, width: 170]Heat Sink Dimensions (mm):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]74 (l) x 125 (w) x 153 (h)[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue, width: 170, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]INCLUDED:[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end, width: 420, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]GC-2 Thermal Compound & Installation Kit for AMD & Intel sockets[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2, width: 170]Life time MTTF at 40C (h):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]50 000[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue, width: 170, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]Noise Level (dBA):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end, width: 420, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]12 – 25.5[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2, width: 170]Static Pressure (mmAq):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]1.6[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue, width: 170, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]Warranty (years):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col-blue-end, width: 420, bgcolor: #F7F7F7]5[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD=class: tab-col2, width: 170]Weight (g):[/TD]
[TD=class: tab-col2-end, width: 420]645[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]


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  • Leo Bien Durana

    Here is an example of how to understand delta temperatures. "If the ambient (room) temperature is 25C and the recorded CPU temperature is 65C, the delta temperature is the CPU's temperature rise above ambient temperature, therefore the delta temperature in this case would be 40C. If the ambient temperature is 23C and the recorded CPU Temperature is 80C, the delta temperature in this case would be 57C. Delta temperature = Recorded CPU temperature – Ambient temperature"

    Best paragraph I read today! I've got so much to learn, but thanks to you sir Luke! Delta Temp is out of the list! *Or is it not? BTW, this is really helpful! Thanks for this great review!

  • lucas4

    Leo Bien Durana;22701 wrote: Best paragraph I read today! I've got so much to learn, but thanks to you sir Luke! Delta Temp is out of the list! *Or is it not? BTW, this is really helpful! Thanks for this great review!

    Glad you found it helpful :)!Delta temperatures are what we use in the charts. We have only recently switched over to using delta temperatures to improve the accuracy of our results, but once we publish more reviews using the new methods, our valued readers such as yourself will become more accustomed to the values and they will be easy to understand :).If you need any help understanding the charts or results using our delta temperature method, feel free to PM me as it is always good to hear what our readers want to know and see :D!

  • gaetan

    Great Review!Actually, delta is used a lot in physics, represented by the Greek D (<span style="font-family: Symbol;"><span style="color: #000000;">D</span></span>), it is used to show the variation of a variable.For example, when used for the movement of an object <span style="font-family: Symbol;"><span style="color: #000000;">D</span></span>v = vf – vi (variation of velocity = velocity final – velocity initial).In this case, as Lucas explained, it is used to represent the variation of temperature of the CPU.Just explaining for anybody not knowing and wishing to know more about Delta.(not saying that you guys don't know :$)I love Physics and mathematics 😀

  • lucas4

    gaetan;23016 wrote: Great Review!Actually, delta is used a lot in physics, represented by the Greek D (<span style="font-family: Symbol;"><span style="color: #000000;">D</span></span>), it is used to show the variation of a variable.For example, when used for the movement of an object <span style="font-family: Symbol;"><span style="color: #000000;">D</span></span>v = vf – vi (variation of velocity = velocity final – velocity initial).In this case, as Lucas explained, it is used to represent the variation of temperature of the CPU.Just explaining for anybody not knowing and wishing to know more about Delta.(not saying that you guys don't know :$)I love Physics and mathematics 😀

    indeed, very well explained :)!my physics and maths background do actually help with the testing procedure as it is similar to a scientific experiment in the procedures and ways of keeping consistent results/accuracy.

  • gaetan

    lucas4;23034 wrote: indeed, very well explained :)!my physics and maths background do actually help with the testing procedure as it is similar to a scientific experiment in the procedures and ways of keeping consistent results/accuracy.

    If every review site used the same accurate way of comparing products, it would surely simplify a readers choice on what product to choose, as there can be so many factors that can have an impact on the results.Albert Einstein once said that physics is just a more complex explaination of everyday life. (something along those lines as I can't remember his exact words)

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