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Sony hacked.. Again!



/ 6 years ago

A hacker allegedly broke into So-net one of Sony’s ISP’s and stole over $1,200 of virtual tokens. Also the security firm F-Secure, discovered a phishing site that was hosted on one of Sony’s server’s in Thailand. So, again Sony has been hacked. This is just barely a month after the last calamity’s, it’s really hitting Sony hard last month they lost over information on over 100 million users. This month they lost another 90 email addresses, which can be used in phishing scams. For those of you that are unaware of phising scams, if you received an email saying “Sony requires your credit card details to verify your account otherwise it will be removed within 7 days”. Sony would never ask for your credit card details in an email. So the person impersonating Sony would have access to your bank account.

The intruder used one IP address to hack the server and used a Bot program to access So-net over 10,000 time before gaining access. The strange thing is even basic forums have the ability to temporarily lock you out after say 3 failed attempts, but there was no such system in place here. Even if the system did not lock out the user, they could have had the system flag up the fact that someone was continuously failing to enter there password correctly.

The Playstation network may be back online, but for how long? Last week Sony had to take down a portion of the network because there was a programming error which would allow hackers to gain access to the system again.

The future is not looking bright for Sony, PS3 trade-ins have been on a steady rise since last month and the Xbox 360, from the off had a larger user base. Lets hope Sony can hold onto some of its users and get the PS4 released with a secure version of the Playstation network running on it. I hope Sony can redeem itself in the future. To do so they need to take better care off their users, the games on offer to users as compensation were a fairly poor mix off cheap or outdated games. Games such as Wipeout HD which is just a PS1 game with improved graphics. The only semi-respectable title was Infamous, but this has been out for a few years now.

If Sony want to keep their users they are going to have to have to take a loss somewhere along the lines.

Attached files

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  • Bonkai

    man, this is not good for them, they should now really lower down their game pierce and console

  • dudes45

    Bonkai;17556 wrote: man, this is not good for them, they should now really lower down their game pierce and console

    Yeah, they do. But they don't have much control on Game prices apart from there own games. But yeah they need to lower the cost of the console a lot. 😀

  • lucas4

    Didn't they learn their lesson the 1st or 2nd times and invest in some good security :(?!

  • dudes45

    lucas4;17561 wrote: Didn't they learn their lesson the 1st or 2nd times and invest in some good security :(?!

    Clearly not. Its really not good. They need to sort it out. Well they should have already.. but..?

  • Eternalchaos

    I wonder how much money sony have lost so far.

  • dudes45

    Eternalchaos;17568 wrote: I wonder how much money sony have lost so far.

    Hmm :p

  • omegadoom13

    Thank you for the news update! Before reading your news article, I didn't know the details of this latest hack. Poor Sony users. I wonder if the US and UK governments should get involved because quite a few users are American and British citizens. I hope this doesn't get any worse.

  • dudes45

    omegadoom13;17578 wrote: Thank you for the news update! Before reading your news article, I didn't know the details of this latest hack. Poor Sony users. I wonder if the US and UK governments should get involved because quite a few users are American and British citizens. I hope this doesn't get any worse.

    No problem ;D. Yeah, im glad I got rid of my PS3 a while ago otherwise I would not be happy. What would the governments do though? Same, its getting ridiculous now. 🙁

  • lucas4

    i think its a case of lost faith from users like myself.i would now hesitate before buying a sony product, because if they dont look after precious data, god knows what they do to cut prices of their electrical products :(!

  • dudes45

    lucas4;17596 wrote: i think its a case of lost faith from users like myself.i would now hesitate before buying a sony product, because if they dont look after precious data, god knows what they do to cut prices of their electrical products :(!

    Yeah, the stupid thing is its not that complicated to protect data. I doubt I'll be buying any gaming consoles anyway. They need to cut the price of their console lol :confused:

  • lucas4

    especially for a multi-billion pound company with a huge reputation.i think its the damage to their rep that will hurt sony the most!

  • omegadoom13

    dudes45;17585 wrote: No problem ;D. Yeah, im glad I got rid of my PS3 a while ago otherwise I would not be happy. What would the governments do though? Same, its getting ridiculous now. 🙁

    Send in the military!!! JK! 🙂 Great question! I apologize now if what you read next offends anyone… Aren't most credit card scams/frauds/hacks coming from Eastern Europe/former soviet union… and aren't most stolen ids/CC numbers/other financial info being passed around online perpetrated by such criminals in those locations? Then perhaps the US, UK, and other European governments can ask politely (in a diplomatic way of course) to the governments where these criminals are doing their dirty work to crack down on such illegal and dangerous activities. If nothing is done by these governments, then we'll stop sending aid … we'll block every agenda they propose to the United Nations and other international committees….make them hurt where it matters, their pocketbooks. IDK how these governments can limit the flow of illegal CC numbers/info and hacks… maybe track the numbers? form an international task force to stop such activities? Maybe someone on the forum has a better understanding of how stuff like this works. 🙂

  • dudes45

    omegadoom13;17607 wrote: Send in the military!!! JK! 🙂 Great question! I apologize now if what you read next offends anyone… Aren't most credit card scams/frauds/hacks coming from Eastern Europe/former soviet union… and aren't most stolen ids/CC numbers/other financial info being passed around online perpetrated by such criminals in those locations? Then perhaps the US, UK, and other European governments can ask politely (in a diplomatic way of course) to the governments where these criminals are doing their dirty work to crack down on such illegal and dangerous activities. If nothing is done by these governments, then we'll stop sending aid … we'll block every agenda they propose to the United Nations and other international committees….make them hurt where it matters, their pocketbooks. IDK how these governments can limit the flow of illegal CC numbers/info and hacks… maybe track the numbers? form an international task force to stop such activities? Maybe someone on the forum has a better understanding of how stuff like this works. 🙂

    Ahh okay lol :p thanks for actually explaining. Thats a fair point.. lol

  • omegadoom13

    dudes45;17611 wrote: Ahh okay lol :p thanks for actually explaining. Thats a fair point.. lol

    lol.. you're welcome! 😉

  • Eternalchaos

    Well i found an estimate on the cost

    http://legitreviews.com/ wrote: Sony released a revised fiscal year 2010 earnings report forewarning a whopping $3.2 billion loss for the year ending March 31, 2011. Because of the PlayStation Network attack in late April Sony estimates the cost of their fiscal year ending March 2012 to be approximately 14 billion yen which is roughly $171 million. The company expects to spend the current fiscal year on “personal information theft protection programs, welcome back programs, network security, enhancements, customer support, and legal. As for the class action suits, Sony sees them at a preliminary stage at the moment and cannot include them in the outcome of the current fiscal year as of yet. Makes you wonder if the PSN will still be free due to such an expected loss.

  • dudes45

    Eternalchaos;17621 wrote: Well i found an estimate on the cost

    Oooo Nice :p.. Cheap then 😎

  • themindboggles

    Ouch! Sony have really got themselves in a pickle here. I think reputation damage is a lot worse than the 3.2 billion loss. Think about going forward the lost confidence which will have an impact on future business. A lot of consoles these days pry themselves on generating more revenue through the use of online services and extras through that service!

  • dudes45

    themindboggles;17625 wrote: Ouch! Sony have really got themselves in a pickle here. I think reputation damage is a lot worse than the 3.2 billion loss. Think about going forward the lost confidence which will have an impact on future business. A lot of consoles these days pry themselves on generating more revenue through the use of online services and extras through that service!

    Definitely. Anyone who is considering a Sony product is going to think twice from now on. Unless Sony do something dramatic. But I don't know what they would do.. :confused:

  • Eternalchaos

    dudes45;17650 wrote: Definitely. Anyone who is considering a Sony product is going to think twice from now on. Unless Sony do something dramatic. But I don't know what they would do.. :confused:

    It is turning in to a game for hackers now :rolleyes:

    Sony BMG’s Greek website was the subject of a hack on the 5th of May, exposing its user database with 8,385 entries to the attention of hackers. The data leaked includes the usual names, phone numbers and so on.

  • lucas4

    with their security so insecure, it looks like the hackers are versing n00bs :D!

  • dudes45

    lucas4;17672 wrote: with their security so insecure, it looks like the hackers are versing n00bs :D!

    What are Sony playing at :eek:This is ridiculous… :p

  • lucas4

    i have to agree with that.im surprised they let it happen once, but im honestly shocked they let it happen multiple times!its totally obscene :@!

  • Eternalchaos

    Here is more on what is happening in detail 😎

    <img src="http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/20075_Sony_Building.jpg&quot; alt="" />Sony has proven itself to be utterly inept when it comes to security. (Source: AFP) <img src="http://images.dailytech.com/nimage/20076_Double_Facepalm_Wide.png&quot; alt="" /> Holy hacking, Batman, these guys are clueless! The display of security incompetence Sony Corp. (6758) is astonishing. Weeks after losing the contents of its two largest databases — <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+to+PS3+PSP+Owners+Your+Credit+Card+Info+May+Have+Been+Stolen+Good+Luck/article21475.htm">the PlayStation Network (PSN) database and the <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+Suffered+an+Additional+Security+Breach+24M+Accounts+Compromised+/article21522.htm">Sony Online Entertainment (SOE) database — the company appears to have lost yet more information after experiencing an attack almost identical to one just days prior.I. Sony Fails to Block Identical AttackOn Sunday, The Hacker News revealed that Sony BMG Greece (the Greek unit of the company's music branch) was <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+Appears+to+Have+Lost+Yet+Another+User+Database/article21697.htm">hacked using an SQL injection attack and lost 8,000+ customer records.Just days later it now appears that just days later a group called LulzSecurity — known for formerly hacking FOX.com's login database — has used an injection attack to <a href="http://www.thehackernews.com/2011/05/lulzsec-leak-sonys-japanese-websites.html">compromise databases on Sony BMG Japan.Astonishingly, Sony appears to have done little to nothing in the way of escaping or parameterization to protect its databases, even in the wake of the SQL injection breach of its Greek property.The hackers accessed an on-site tablet that did not appear to contain any personally identifiable information. They openly mocked Sony, openly, <a href="http://twitter.com/?q=lulzsec#%21/LulzSec">posting to Twitter, "LOL @Sony, Nice Japanese website dumbasses (sic)."They later posted, "This isn't a l337 h4x0r, we just want to embarrass Sony some more. Can this be hack number 8? 7 and a half?!"While the hack itself was obviously just designed to target Sony and not hurt its customers, the hackers did post publicly that there was two other databases on the site that they did not look at, but should be accessible using the injection attack.This message was likely up for hours — at least — before Sony heard about it and shut down access to its servers. In the meantime it's very feasible that other users — including outright malicious ones — could have stolen information from these tables. As tables on the Sony BMG Greece website contained users' names, passwords, etc. it's quite possible that one of these tables held similar information, and you can almost guarantee that there would be many more records than in the Greece table, as Japan is Sony's home nation.II. Sony Intrusion Send Clear Message to Customers — You Can't Trust SonySophos Security researcher MSFT) or Nintendo Comp., Ltd. Reportedly some customers are already doing exactly that.III. High Costs for SonyThe average cost of a system intrusion in 2010 was $318 USD per record lost, up 48 percent from a year prior. Sony claims that the loss of 101 million records will only cost it $2 USD per record. Unless the company has found the mother of all "bulk discounts", when it comes to data loss payouts, the company appears to be seriously understating the cost to its bottom line.The company is currently in the throes of <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+Hit+With+First+Lawsuit+After+Losing+101+Million+Customer+Records/article21540.htm">multiple class action lawsuits.At the end of the day Sony, much <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Gawker+Media+Suffers+Massive+Data+Breach+Courtesy+of+Gnosis/article20384.htm">like Gawker Media, brought on the attacks by lashing out the greater hacker community, particularly the massive hacker collective Anonymous, which has at least 10,000 members internationally. Sony provoked the hackers when they decided to <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Update+PS3+Slim+Officially+Announced+Will+Go+On+Sale+September+1/article16010.htm">kill homebrews and Linux on the PlayStation 3 after allowing and even supporting those popular offerings for the console's early years. The hackers were further infuriated by the fact that Sony <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Geohot+Fail0verflow+Sued+by+Sony+for+PS3+Jailbreaking/article20645.htm">sued iconic hardware hacker George "GeoHot" Hotz — something that even GeoHot's perpetual target Apple, Inc (<a href="http://www.google.com/finance?q=aapl">AAPL) hadn't dared do.The humiliation of Sony's security is proof that the online world is still very much like the Wild West. If you anger one person enough, you may need protection; but if you <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Anonymous+Engages+in+Sony+DDoS+Attacks+Over+GeoHot+PS3+Lawsuit/article21282.htm">anger the masses, half-baked protection outfits may not be good enough.Sony has clearly been exposed as the inferior to the hackers in cyber-security. With customers growing wary of the company, it may pay dearly for its failings to protect its online properties.In a sign of the times, even as Sony hopes to <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/US+PSN+Service+May+Resume+Tuesday/article21690.htm">restart its PlayStation Network in the U.S. <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Sony+PSN+Web+Access+Down+Again+After+New+Exploit+Discovered/article21674.htm">after a second outage, the Japanese government is <a href="http://www.dailytech.com/Japan+Refuses+to+Approve+Sonys+PSN+Reboot+Demands+Proof+of+Security/article21638.htm">denying it permission to restart. They say they're not convinced that Sony is any more able to protect its customers, this time around.

  • omegadoom13

    ARRGH!… man I truly feel sorry for the users… and I must say it, I feel sorry for Sony. Thanks for the info Eternalchaos. A once reputable company who still makes high-quality products but its image has been damaged because of preventable security holes… sad.

  • lucas4

    @ Eternalchaos,i am disappointed :(!it needs at least this :D!<img src="http://www.deviantart.com/download/151133362/Nuclear_Facepalm_Poster_by_Nianden.jpg&quot; alt="" />

  • lucas4

    omegadoom13;17722 wrote: ARRGH!… man I truly feel sorry for the users… and I must say it, I feel sorry for Sony. Thanks for the info Eternalchaos. A once reputable company who still makes high-quality products but its image has been damaged because of preventable security holes… sad.

    u feel sorry for sony o.O?!if they wont invest in proper security, they have deserved everything that has bitten them with the hacks!they didnt even tell us users until over 2 weeks later iirc

  • omegadoom13

    lucas4;17736 wrote: u feel sorry for sony o.O?!if they wont invest in proper security, they have deserved everything that has bitten them with the hacks!they didnt even tell us users until over 2 weeks later iirc

    Well, I'm not the type of person who would continue to kick someone when he's already down and unconscious. These new attacks kinda feels like that. Yes, I agree. It was absolutely wrong of Sony to wait so long to tell users. That is unforgettable because that time is more than plenty for the hackers to distribute, use, and consequently damage the credit of these users before they knew what happened.

  • themindboggles

    Well i dont think its more a case of kicking someone whilst they are down. You could say in some respects that the hackers are highlighting major security flaws in their systems which need addressing and unsless they do it properly they are going to keep getting attacked. The only poeple who should feel sorry are the customers who could have had their details stolen

  • dudes45

    lucas4;17672 wrote: with their security so insecure, it looks like the hackers are versing n00bs :D!

    lol.. they are :p hah

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