Intel Core i9-7900X X-Series 10-Core Processor Review



/ 3 months ago

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Testing and Methodology


Test Procedure

Here at eTeknix, we endeavour to disclose vital information regarding the benchmarking process so that readers can quantify the results and attempt to replicate them using their hardware. When it comes to CPU reviews, the benchmarks are pretty self-explanatory although there are a few exceptions. Please note, we prefer to re-test each CPU within a product’s performance range to ensure the results are accurate and reflect any changes to our samples over time or enhancements via graphics drivers.

This means we now include fewer results, but they are more reliable and easier to decipher. As always, your choice of motherboard, the silicon lottery and other factors can yield different numbers, and there’s always a margin for error when using software. Therefore, your experience may vary. Each benchmark runs three times, and the average figure is taken to try to reduce the effect of hardware variation. Of course, any relevant details regarding the parameters will be listed below.

Handbrake

To stress processors to their absolute limit and accurately judge their performance in video editing workloads, we transcode a 7.7GB compilation of gaming footage; this particular file is freely available from here. The captured footage is 22 minutes and 12 seconds long, it has a bit rate of 50.1 Mbps and it uses the Advanced Video Codec. Additionally, the video runs at a constant 30 frames-per-second and opts for a 3820×2140 (4K) resolution. Once loaded into Handbrake, we then transcode the 4K MP4 to an MKV file using the “normal” profile.

Test Systems

X299

  • Motherboard – Gigabyte AORUS Gaming 9
  • RAM – Crucial DDR4 2400Mhz Quad-Channel
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

AM4 Ryzen R5

  • Motherboard – ASRock Fatal1ty B350 AM4 Motherboard
  • RAM – GEIL Evo X DDR4 2933/3200MHz
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

AM4 Ryzen R7

  • Motherboard – MSI XPower Titanimum X370
  • RAM – Crucial BAllistix 2666MHz (Soon to be upgraded and retested)
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
SEE ALSO:  Gamemax Moonstone Tempered Glass RGB Chassis Review

Z270

  • Motherboard – Combination used to determine widespread performance
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

X99

  • Motherboard – ASUS ROG STRIX X99 GAMING
  • RAM – 32GB Crucial Ballistix Sport (4x8GB) 2400MHz (16-16-16-39)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z170

  • Motherboard – ASRock Z170 Extreme7+
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z87

  • Motherboard – ASUS Maximus VII Ranger
  • RAM – 16GB Crucial Ballistix Sport XT (2 x 8GB) DDR3 1866MHz (10-10-10-30)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Games Used

  • Ashes of the Singularity (DirectX 12)
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider (DirectX 12)
  • Shadow of Mordor
  • Tomb Raider

Test Software

  • Cinebench – available here
  • 3DMark – available here
  • AIDA64 Engineer – available here
  • CPUID HWMonitor – available here
  • CPU-Z – available here
  • Handbrake – available here
  • WPrime – available here

Thank you Noctua, Crucial, ASUS, Gigabyte, Lian-Li, be quiet!, OCZ, for providing the hardware that helps makes these tests possible!


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Comments

6 Responses to “Intel Core i9-7900X X-Series 10-Core Processor Review”
  1. kaz says:

    amd ryzen 1800x has new performance improvement is it being shown here?

    • Andres Reyes says:

      At the moment you can’t the mosfets and VRM get over 100°C even the Motherboard CPU cables get up to 65°C and it was test on a bench open air now imagine inside a case.

  2. How much better performance does it offer as compared to the previous model ?

  3. Patrick Bateman says:

    This is what happens when you have no real competition for almost a decade and then suddenly your competition comes out with a product that is much cheaper and also faster in some workloads. Intel went from 10 cores to 18 cores as a reaction to thread-ripper. Yet, they messed up by using thermal-paste (a cheap one at that, not your arctic silver 5 or conductonaut) on a CPU that costs 1000 dollars instead of soldering it directly. Intel also messed up with the platform. The VRMs can barely handle the 10 core CPU, much less the 18 core. The Core i7 7740K and Core i5 7640K have no business being on HEDT. It should have gone to the mainstream platform instead, because they only support dual channel and have relatively limited PCI-E lanes. The only justification would have been the addition of quad-channel memory and adding PCI-E lanes, which they did not do to save money on a redesign. I hope Intel market share in CPUs falls to under 50% so that they wake up and realize that their anti-consumer and anti-competitive practices are not going to work anymore.

    • S.O.T.O.S says:

      What competition Ryzen is losing from Core i7 in almost all games and Threadripper is expected slower from Core i9….Intel is still the king of performance

      • Chaos says:

        Marginally losing and it’s half the price. Totally no competition.

        “Threadripper is expected slower from Core i9”

        This is especially true in HEDT segment when “muh megahurtz” mean jack.

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