porno

Freescale Semiconductor Creates Insanely Tiny ARM Chip as Implant



/ 4 years ago

 

Chipmaker; Freescale Semiconductor wanted to make a chip that can be implanted into a human body, and by doing so they’ve created the world’s smallest ARM-powered chip model; the Kinetis KL02.

The KL02 is as small as 1.9 x 2mm. Despite the insanely tiny footprint, the fully loaded multi-controller unit has a processor, RAM , ROM, Clock and I/O controller. It uses 32k flash storage, 4K memory, a 32bit processor, a 12-bit analog to digital converter and a low power Universal Asynchronous receiver/transceiver in a single die shrink, which allows devices to be made tiny enough that one can use it as swallow-able computers. Freescale said that they’ve been working with customers and partners to make this happen, but they can’t say anything further as the product is not announced officially.

In all honesty, devices as tiny as this can not only help doctors and even surgeons to understand their patients but users can also use it to keep a track on their health. If this is perfected as swallow-able computers, the possibility of it are endless.

As of now, Freescale is working with health and wellness clients such as Fitbit and the Omipod insulin pump which uses the company’s chips. The KL02 as of now is meant to be used with stuff like Nike+ where it can be used to wirelessly report your steps.

Steve Tateosian, Freescale’s Global manager, said,”We come across hundreds of micro-controllers embedded in the devices we use throughout the day. For example, you may come across them when your alarm wakes you up, you brush your teeth, make your coffee, unlock your car door, open your garage, put down the car window, pay the parking meter, tell the time on your watch, measure your heart rate, distance, and pace. While running you may listen to your music player with several controllers inside, including in the ear buds themselves.”

The multi-controller is available for retail but the KL02 is specifically designed only in response to a customer’s request.

Source: Wired


Topics: , , , , , , ,