iFixit Opens Up the Xbox One To See What It’s Really Made Of

/ 3 years ago


When you look inside the Xbox One, you cannot help but think that it is an all too familiar sight. We all know that the consoles coming out this month are using standard PC hardware to power them, but the stuff inside is even more standard that most people were expecting.

Normal looking hard drives, SATA II ports and a whopping big cooler make up the most obvious parts. In fact, if you’re brave enough to get inside this thing, avoiding any damage to the wireless module and the internal speaker, you could easily just plug in any 2.5″ hard drive of your own. But remember that you’ll be kissing your warranty goodbye, something you never want to do on a launch console unless you have a lot of spare cash lying around.

The huge fan takes up a quarter of the console, no doubt about it, this thing can shift some serious air! Not to mention keep things cool at low RPM inside the Xbox One, something that will help it stay nice and quiet.

The Blu-Ray drive looks pretty much off the shelve too, with a thick casing that you see in many desktop units and with the large fan, the chunky optical drive, SATA cables etc, you have to wonder that Microsoft could have easily stripped back a few things to make the console smaller. However, it is also likely that cost was an issue and as things become more profitable there is easily room to save space here, Xbox One Slim anyone?

iFixit awarded an 8 / 10 for repairability to the Xbox One, placing it on par with the PlayStation 4.

Thank you PocketLint for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of PocketLint.

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  • Alistair Hardy

    is the heat sink an AMD standard or MS’s own?
    It would be interesting to see what hardware modders do with the new gen consoles.

    • Joe

      I wonder about adding extra powered hardware. Water cooling, anyone?

      • AbirWebster

        I was thinking about that too!Things might get possible.

  • Timmay’s Para-Cord

    I would like to know the led sizes. Modders will have a ball with new gen consoles 🙂

  • Mark Smith

    It’s a shame that it’s using SATA II. It would of been awesome to install an SSD in there and get the full benefits from SATA III

    • zerocool

      These company’s install low end upgradable tech at launch because a year or two down the line the “Elite Edition” or what ever it will be called will be produced with the SSD, faster clock speeds, different designs ect ect. This type of upgrading dosnt drive innovation since they are just upgrading to tech already available. If they launched a new console with current tech or better (like Steam Box!), this would boost the innovations game but sadly they dont do it because they know people will buy and buy anyway *cough APPLE cough*

      • Steve

        etc etc

  • Mike

    Replacing parts like the HDD will lead to an instant console ban by MS. Only Sony allows users to replace the HDD.

  • Joshua Jax Jordan

    At least they FINALLY put a fan into the damn console… Hasn’t been a fan OVER the heatsink ever. Just having a shitty exhaust fan ISN’T enough if all the 360s overheating were not evidence enough.

    My issue however now is they seem to have put a single MASSIVE heatsink over BOTH the CPU and GPU? Sure it’ll work but that’s not the best design… please tell me Foxconn did not have their hands in it this time around…

    • nameloc312

      over heating 360’s was do to owners not blowing it out with a air can or compressor and the owners manual says to sooooo yeah i still have a gen one 360 and it has never over heated

      • Joshua Jax Jordan

        Problem here is design… I blew the crap out of my 360 with compressed air in every open hole/port it had and outside of the fan area there was no way to get air to actually hit the heatsink. My 360 finally RROD’d and after taking it apart I found a 3g heatsink CAKED in dust so thick it wouldn’t come off. The 360 was a bad design out of the box, only had an exhaust fan, did NOT have proper air intake or ventilation around the heatsink… ridiculous. As a computer builder I’m surprised the console lasted as long as it did before RROD’ing. Xclamps didn’t help anything though.

        Theoritically if you had your xbox in a well ventilated area, and the air conditioning never went above 70F and it sat under that vent… I could see it never overheating, although it would still be running dangerously hot. With a stock fan, Artic Silver thermal paste and a 3g heatsink my console was running upwards of 160F IDLE and this is just too hot. Gaming the heatsink is pushing dangerously close to where a laptop would force shutdown to prevent damage, except the Xbox goes WAY above that limit…

        Meh, regardless fan over heatsink GOOD, ability to actually get compressed air onto heatsink GOOD. Improved design, although I’d like shielding to direct the airflow out of the case and an additional fan at least.

        • Tipstaff

          Just an FYI, both the original Slim and the new Slim E have fans directly over the heatsink, so they did change it (just do a search on iFixit for the Slim and Slim E teardown). The problem, however, is that it’s still an exhaust fan. Now that the CPU and GPU are on the same die it’s more imperative for them to cool it down, yet here we are with the same idea of exhausting air inside the case rather than an intake over the CPU/GPU with outside air, and exhausting the hot air out via another fan.

          The big problem for me is that the brand spanking new E STILL overheats. 2 weeks after buying GTA V my Slim E (which I replaced my Falcon model for) overheated to the point it wouldn’t output past 480p without severe signal loss. So here I am again worrying about my 360, treating it like a freaking piece of china, hoping it doesn’t die on me… again.