XFX R9 280X Double Dissipation Black Edition OC 3GB Graphics Card Review



/ 12 months ago

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Introduction


XFX R9 280X DD BE OC (14)

AMD’s R9 280X was released a couple of weeks ago and for anyone who has followed AMD graphics cards since 2011 the R9 280X is a very familiar card – in effect it is just a HD 7970 rebranded with a reduced price. On launch day we had a review of the R9 280X to bring you and today we’ve got another R9 280X to look at, this time courtesy of XFX. The XFX R9 280X uses XFX’s new Double Dissipation cooling solution with dual 100mm fans but it is also a Black Edition OC card which means the default clock has been raised from 1000MHz on the core to 1100MHz and from 1500/6000MHz to 1650/6600MHz on the memory. The new cooling solution opts for a sleek black aesthetic which contrasts with the sharp silver design of previous Double Dissipation coolers from XFX.

xfx_r9_280x_stock

On the packaging XFX is keen to point out the three big features of this graphics card. Two of them are related to the cooling solution, the fact it uses the Double Dissipation cooling and that this is done with a pair of 100mm fans. The last part is interesting for overclockers and that is XFX have unlocked the voltage. This means overclocking should go further than normal, I have heard that the R9 280X is capable of around 1250MHz+ with voltage increases so we will be keen to test if that really is the case.XFX R9 280X DD BE OC (1)

The back of the box gives a quick summary of the key features about the product.

XFX R9 280X DD BE OC (2)

Included is a bunch of documentation and marketing material as well as some driver CDs.

XFX R9 280X DD BE OC (3)

Accessories are basic and we’ve got a couple of power supply adapters, a CrossFire bridge and a warranty card with all your serial and part numbers on in case you need to claim your warranty for whatever reason.

XFX R9 280X DD BE OC (4)

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  • Viktor Gregorenko

    ШИКАРНАЯ ВИДЕОКАРТА

  • Matthew Humpherson

    You seem to have real problems overclocking a lot of cards you get in for review. Have you tried swapping out other parts of your test bench to see if it fixes it?

    • http://www.eteknix.com/ Ryan Martin

      The majority of cards we get overclock okay. The only cards I can think of that didn’t were the two MSI GTX 700 ones (GTX 760/GTX 770 TF Gaming) and this card. Everything else did what was expected or sometimes more. Overclocking is more a result of the silicon lottery than anything else. We’ve got a capable motherboard, CPU and PSU so there’s no reason to assume it is being caused by anything other than rubbish overclocking samples.

  • Michael

    These temps make no sense. Unless you are testing inside of a commercial refrigerator there is no way your temps can be this low. Cards at less then 5c when idle??? That would literally be just 5 degrees above freezing, so even if powered off those cards could never hit those temps as they would never go below the ambient room temperature.

    Your 290 and 290X temps under load are also a full 20c, or more, then every other benchmark that has been posted. No way these numbers are real unless you are doing something else to chill the units.

    • http://www.eteknix.com/ Ryan Martin

      We use delta temperatures as stated in the methodology and as written on the graphs, normally the room temperature is about 21-23 degrees.

      That way readers can estimate what temperatures it will run at for them by adding on their typical room temperature. Of course if it is an card with a thermal control point (which is increasingly becoming the trend these days) then deltas can become a little irrelevant.