AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X 16c 32t Processor Review



/ 3 months ago

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AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X 16c 32t Processor Review

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X

The time has finally come, where we get to fire up the new flagship AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X processor on our test bench. Equipped with an incredible 16-core and 32-thread design, this CPU promises to deliver extreme performance to the masses. Of course, this processor is much bigger than its consumer-friendly Ryzen brothers and uses the new TR4 socket and X399 chipset. With that in mind, you’ll need a new TR4 motherboard too, and with all the major brands having boards at launch, there’s already a good few to pick from.

What is X399?

The new X399 chipset is the extreme end of the Ryzen spectrum, set to compete with the HEDT solutions from Intel such as their X99 and X299 motherboards. It’ll support quad-channel memory with up to 8 x DDR4 DIMMS, a first for Ryzen chips. However, the big star of the show is a staggering 64 PCIe lanes, allowing for extreme bandwidth for multi-GPU and PCIe attached storage devices.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X Specs

  • CPU Type: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper
  • CPU Model: 1950X
  • Socket: TR4
  • Architecture: Zen
  • Manufacturing Process: 14nm
  • No. of Cores: 16 Core
  • No. of Threads: 32 Threads
  • Clock Speed: 3.4GHz
  • Turbo Speed: 4.0GHz
  • Unlocked CPU: Yes
  • Max. Memory Speed: DDR4-2666
  • Max. Memory Channels: Quad (4)
  • ECC Memory Support: No
  • PCIe Lanes Supported: 64
  • L1 Cache: 1.125MB
  • L2 Cache: 8MB
  • L3 Cache: 40MB
  • Max. TDP: 180W

Check out the official AMD product page here.

Features

As with all the mainstream Ryzen chips, the new 1950x also features SenseMI, an unlocked multiplier for easy overclocking, and more. You can tweak away in the BIOS, or use AMD’s Ryzen Master Utility to squeeze extra performance when you need it.

Monster Sized Chip!

The first thing you’ll notice about this CPU is that it’s easily the biggest chip you can buy as a consumer. Interestingly, it comes mounted in a caddy that allows you to slide it down into the socket. It’s a unique install procedure and requires special tools. Of course, those tools are included with your purchase, so don’t worry about that.

In the box, you’ll find the chip, a cooling bracket, torque screw driver, and the usual documentation. But enough of the box, let’s fire up this beast on our test bench!

 

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Comments

6 Responses to “AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X 16c 32t Processor Review”
  1. Matt Booth says:

    The gaming performance is shocking. Something isn’t right when Ryzen chips are doing better. Probably some microcode improvements to be made me thinks.

    Anyway, this is what Ryzen should’ve been!

    • Sykobee says:

      Did the review using ThreadRipper’s Gaming Mode for the gaming tests? See AnandTech…

      IMO you’re not 1080p gaming with a TR if you’re even slightly sane, so those results can be ignored.

  2. zarac says:

    Oh come on, even kindergarten kids know that ThreadRipper supports ECC RAM. Please fix that in the article.

    https://www.amd.com/en/products/ryzen-threadripper

    “Up to 16 cores and 32 threads for lightning-fast creative workloads.

    An unprecedented 64 PCIe® Gen3 lanes to meet large GPU and NVMe needs.

    Up to 40MB of combined cache for rapid access to large data sets.

    Quad channel DDR4 with support for ECC for reliable throughput.”

  3. This processor is really huge and so is its raw performance. It is quite shame that the gaming performance is not at all satisfactory.

  4. roadkill612 says:

    “For some gamers, not having a couple of FPS extra isn’t a big deal, especially if the CPU can still render a video stream in the background without making other compromises. It’s tough to say how many, but there’s a market for a CPU like this, it’s likely just not your typical PC gamer.”

    Seems a convoluted pro intel argument.

    How about:

    If the knowledge worker Cpu CANT still render a video stream/compile etc.in the background without making other compromises, then It’s tough to say how many, but there’s a market for a CPU like this, it’s likely just not your typical user in control of their life.”

    The question for the target market is?, can it excel at work tasks, yet perform a dual task, OR, is it much worse than a dedicated, separate, single app, futureless gaming pc. To say “you get no better gaming for the extra money is irrelevant.”

    If both needs exist, but priorities are reversed, then clearly the ryzen suits, esp the frugal 6 cores for some reason, and a little more patience is needed for the infrequent core heavy tasks. (Sigh, it seems only yesterday 8C WAS for core heavy tasks.)

    Are people also really as silly as pundits assume, & they think they are dealing with a static target – that their PCs wont get loaded up with more and more distractions over the years of ownership?

    Pundits also fail in their duty to newbies by not forewarning of the inevitable lane shortage they face when they upgrade meaningfully. Only a $1000usd Intel or TR give any real latitude/peace of mind on expanding HB resources.

    They should also be warned (long story) that intels ~switched/filtered lanes are not the equal of amdS honest lanes.

    Some loss of latency from doubling ryzens zeppelin dies on a a TR MCM is inevitable. Whats remarkable is how little a latency penalty is paid for the benefits of extra lanes. They still overclock to the ryzen sweet spot of 3200 ram & 4k OC for the cpu.

    I am puzzled by memory tests here. Others have shown? a ~linear benefit from the 4 channel TR vs the 2 channel ryzen – a major bonus if true?

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