GEEEK A60 Mini-ITX Case & Riser Cable Review




/ 2 weeks ago
GEEEK A60 Mini-ITX Case Review

Not all cases are created equally, and that’s especially true of the GEEEK range. While most cases are stamped out of steel, these ones are mostly cut from plastic panels that mount onto aluminium rails. Furthermore, they come flat-packed, and you have to build them yourself! So, not your typical PC case then. We actually previewed a couple of these a while back, but now it seems GEEEK are ready to take the UK market by storm, and we couldn’t be happier. They’re whacky, a bit different, and utterly unique; what’s not to love?

GEEEK A60 Mini-ITX

The A60 is equipped with support for a mini-ITX motherboard. However, it’s just big enough in length to also support both an ATX PSU, as well as a decent size graphics card. There are some optional fan mounts too, but otherwise, that’s about it. It’s a small mini-ITX case, so there’s not really a lot more to it. It does come in either matte black or white versions though; we have the matte black model here today.

What’s in the Box?

  • 1 x A60 Case (Not pre-assembled)
  • 1 x Front Dual USB 3.0 Cable (400mm)
  • 1 x 16mm Blue LED Power Switch (400mm)
  • 4 x Foot Pad
  • 1 x Screws

Specifications

ModelA60
Available ColorMatte Black | White
MaterialsAcrylic, Aluminium Frame
Case Dimensions158 x 252 x 332mm (W x H x D)
MotherboardMini-ITX (17 x 17cm)
Drives2.5″ SSD/HDD x 2
Front portsUSB 3.0 x 2
Expansion Slots2
Cooling SystemTop : 120mm Fan x2 (Optional)
Bottom : 120x15mm Fan x1 (Optional)
Power Supply TypeSFX

For in-depth specifications, please visit the official product page here. If you want to see a more detailed guide on how to build the PC case, you can see their installation guide here. I’ve some experience with these, and honestly, it’s not easy, but it is a fun project regardless; maybe the A60 will be a little easier, let’s find out!

Flat Pack Party

So, as I said, this isn’t a “regular” case build. It comes in a rather small flat-packed box.

Inside, you’ll literally find a box of parts. They’re all nicely packaged, wrapped, and covered in plastic film.

Out of the box, there really are quite a lot of pieces here. It’s going to be a bit of a jigsaw, but fortunately, the instructions look fairly straightforward to follow.

The Components

The pass-through power cable.

The riser cable, which isn’t included as standard, but is a recommended $20 extra. You can buy the case and this cable from their storefront.

Some USB ports.

Bits n’ Bobs

The smaller box contained a few of the aluminium rails, as well as a bundle of screws and fittings, the feet, and other attachments.

These are the larger rails, which are also all made from aluminium.

They have grooves in the sides that’ll hold the retaining screws for the side panels.

Panels!

Here we have the side panels, bottom, top, and back. They’re not grey though, there’s just loads of plastic film on each side to keep them free from scratches in transit. I will unwrap all this as it gets built.

Well, there’s only one thing for it. I’m off to put the TV on, sit on the floor and pick through some of this build. I suspect this will take a while, but I’m quite looking forward to it; it’s certainly something a bit different.

Coming Together

Building this case is a bit of a long process. I’ve had some experience building GEEEK cases when we did a preview. However, even I know it’s not going to come together quickly. A few episodes of American pickers on the left, the instruction PDF on the right, cup of tea and tools on my desk… let’s do this!

Slot and Slide

The main rails go together easily enough, with just a few screws bulking out the skeleton of the case. Screwing the back panel on holds it all in place. Then it’s simply screwing in what you need; PSU cable, motherboard plate and standoffs, etc.

Hardware

Surprisingly, the recommends you install your system while you build. So here, it asked me to install the motherboard. Rather than put the side panels and top on, then have to take them off again to build the PC. It makes sense really.

Riser

Installing the riser cable was a bit tricky, but far from impossible. It’s exactly the length it needs to be and not really 1mm more, so it was tight. The instructions aren’t as clear as they could be though, for the whole thing. However, a little common sense and paying attention to the screw/standoff size guide helps a lot.

GPU Time

With that in place, it suggests that you install the GPU at this point. Now, I should point out that this would also be the time to route any PSU cables. However, I’m not using cables here as my PSU is a little longer than expect and… they don’t fit. Obviously, if you buy this case, you’ll buy hardware to fit; I’m working with what’s in my cupboard here folks.

I could get a bigger GPU in here, but I didn’t see the point. It’s not the biggest case in the world, so putting some fire breathing monster in it didn’t make sense to me.

Gorgeous

The use of a riser cable is a perfect patch here though. This means that the dual windows on this case can show off the GPU on one side and the motherboard/PSU on the other.

Complete System

Finally, we have the GEEEK A60 complete. Well, almost, as I still need to put the side panels on, but all of the hardware is in there; including that lovely mechanical power switch.

There’s room for a good size GPU in there for sure. However, with a shorter card, you could use this as a small cable routing space too. I’ve left out the SSD mount, as the motherboard I’m using has M.2. However, what you need is up to you, and if you desire SSDs, you can screw that mount in also.

Top Panel

This top panel cover offers plenty of ventilation. However, it also sports two 120mm fan mounts and room for a slim radiator. If you wanted to fit a 240mm AIO, you would mount it to this panel prior to installing the panel.

Side Panels

Now that we have the side panels in place, the GEEEK A60 looks super neat and tidy. I picked up a bit of static and dust in the build process though. However, a quick blast of compressed air quickly smartened that up.

From the left side, you can see the GPU flexing its stuff. There’s a good amount of ventilation here too, so airflow to the card is pretty decent overall.

Plus, while being plastic, the overall quality of the panels really shines. You just can’t get that kind of CNC work on tempered glass, it would not work at all; if it did, the price would frankly be enormous.

Right side

Obviously, I have the case on the right side of my monitor. However, the build would look good on either side. On the right, you can see the PSU and the motherboard, so it’s really up to you how you place it. It is more of an “on the desk” case than an “under the desk” case though.

There’s lots of air flow here too. The left and right side panels both have the same ventilated design.

Not forgetting all the ventilation in the top also. Again, you can add fans here if you desire. However, there are no filters, so keep that in mind when you set up your airflow pattern.

Final Thoughts

The GEEEK A60 Mini-ITX PC Case is available now from Amazon.co.uk for just £109.99. However, that does include the PCIe Riser Cable which is worth £24.99 and is a recommended add-on; so the case is really only £85. That’s a good price for something so unique, compact and stylish.

Overview

There are plenty of case makers out there offering a lot of fantastic choices for around £100. With that in mind, GEEEK are coming up against some strong competition. However, let’s not forget that it’s really about £80-85 plus the riser cable, which makes its value a lot more appealing. What GEEEK does offer over their rivals, however, is just how unique it is.

CNC Magic

The case is made from a few aluminium rails with a bunch of custom CNC perspex plastic panels making up the bulk of the case. For modders, it’s a very appealing option. To mod it, you don’t have to break it down first. you can etch, spray, cut and change everything you desire as you go, which could lead to some really fantastic modded builds using the GEEEK A60.

Tricky

Putting the GEEEK A60 wasn’t particularly easy, but hardly a mega brain workout either. The instructions are workable, but still, they fall into some of the flat-pack furniture tropes of being a bit confusing at times. I’ve only put two of these together in the last year, so I’m hardly a pro, but I can see it being a little off-putting to first time system builders. If you’re confident with a screwdriver and have a bit of time to spare, however, it’s a pretty fun project.

Should I Buy One?

Well, it’s a bit of a niche product, make no mistake. However, I’m sure many of you can see the appeal here. It’s superbly compact, looks unlike anything else out there, and being so involved in the build of the case is rather rewarding too. Honestly, it’s a little impractical to build but well worth it, and the end result is something you’ll be proud to place on your desktop.

GEEEK A60 Mini-ITX Case Review


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