Intel Core i7-7740X Skylake-X Processor Review



/ 3 weeks ago

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Testing and Methodology


Test Procedure

Here at eTeknix, we endeavour to disclose vital information regarding the benchmarking process so that readers can quantify the results and attempt to replicate them using their hardware. When it comes to CPU reviews, the benchmarks are pretty self-explanatory although there are a few exceptions. Please note, we prefer to re-test each CPU within a product’s performance range to ensure the results are accurate and reflect any changes to our samples over time or enhancements via graphics drivers.

This means we now include fewer results, but they are more reliable and easier to decipher. As always, your choice of motherboard, the silicon lottery and other factors can yield different numbers, and there’s always a margin for error when using software. Therefore, your experience may vary. Each benchmark runs three times, and the average figure is taken to try to reduce the effect of hardware variation. Of course, any relevant details regarding the parameters will be listed below.

Handbrake

To stress processors to their absolute limit and accurately judge their performance in video editing workloads, we transcode a 7.7GB compilation of gaming footage; this particular file is freely available from here. The captured footage is 22 minutes and 12 seconds long, it has a bit rate of 50.1 Mbps and it uses the Advanced Video Codec. Additionally, the video runs at a constant 30 frames-per-second and opts for a 3820×2140 (4K) resolution. Once loaded into Handbrake, we then transcode the 4K MP4 to an MKV file using the “normal” profile.

Test Systems

X299

  • Motherboard – Gigabyte AORUS Gaming 9
  • RAM – Crucial DDR4 2400Mhz Quad-Channel
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

AM4 Ryzen R5

  • Motherboard – ASRock Fatal1ty B350 AM4 Motherboard
  • RAM – GEIL Evo X DDR4 2933/3200MHz
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

AM4 Ryzen R7

  • Motherboard – MSI XPower Titanimum X370
  • RAM – Crucial BAllistix 2666MHz (Soon to be upgraded and retested)
  • CPU Cooler – Noctua D15S with dual fans
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit
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Z270

  • Motherboard – Combination used to determine widespread performance
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

X99

  • Motherboard – ASUS ROG STRIX X99 GAMING
  • RAM – 32GB Crucial Ballistix Sport (4x8GB) 2400MHz (16-16-16-39)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z170

  • Motherboard – ASRock Z170 Extreme7+
  • RAM – Crucial Ballistix Elite 16GB (2x8GB) 2666MHz (16-17-17)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Z87

  • Motherboard – ASUS Maximus VII Ranger
  • RAM – 16GB Crucial Ballistix Sport XT (2 x 8GB) DDR3 1866MHz (10-10-10-30)
  • CPU Cooler – Thermaltake Water 3.0 with Gelid GC-Extreme
  • Graphics Card – Gigabyte G1 Gaming GTX 980Ti
  • Power Supply – BeQuiet Dark Power Pro 850 Watt
  • Main Storage Drive – Toshiba OCZ VX500 500GB
  • Chassis – Lian Li T80 Test Bench
  • Operating System – Windows 10 Pro 64 Bit

Games Used

  • Ashes of the Singularity (DirectX 12)
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider (DirectX 12)
  • Shadow of Mordor
  • Tomb Raider

Test Software

  • Cinebench – available here
  • 3DMark – available here
  • AIDA64 Engineer – available here
  • CPUID HWMonitor – available here
  • CPU-Z – available here
  • Handbrake – available here
  • WPrime – available here

Thank you Noctua, Crucial, ASUS, Gigabyte, Lian-Li, be quiet!, OCZ, for providing the hardware that helps makes these tests possible!


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  • VoiceOfLogic

    Please correct the threads number. It’s shown as 4c/4t when it’s 4c/8t

    😉

  • Xfce

    “Again, rock solid results here. We’re not breaking any records, but it’s about where it should be for the price”.

    What is the reviewer smoking??. At 5Ghz this overpriced quad core POS only managed to outperform the $130 cheaper 1600 at 3.9Ghz by 2 FPS in that game LOL. Let alone the cost of the x299 mobo needed to run that chip. For the price, this chip performs horribly, i wouldn’t even buy it at the same price as a 1600…